How do you choose the right wedding car?

In the bad old days before Tim Berners-Lee had his game-changing brainwave, budding brides and grooms faced a rather arid landscape when it came to surveying their choice of wedding wheels. The internet, thankfully, has turned that outlook into a pretty lush and verdant meadow, with frankly more choice than you can throw a well-aimed bouquet at.

The array of cars available for wedding duties ranges from early twentieth century vintage motors to modern supercars and all points in between. Power can come from petrol, diesel or even hay. And, like many aspects of life ushered in by the internet, the breadth of choice and the decisions it offers can be a little bewildering. So here, for the simple purposes of helping you choose to hire a car from Great Escape Cars, is our guide to making the right choices when it comes to your wedding car.

Drive it or be driven?

Tradition has it that the bride and groom are driven to the ceremony in a pukka saloon piloted by a chap in a hat. Chauffeur wedding cars remain the most common choice and, for many, the only one because they're traditional and relatively straightforward.  Wedding venues often have good links with chauffeur hire companies so tend to recommend them. This option is well tested and you get a service as well as just a car.
The trend towards bespoke, individual DIY weddings has seen self drive wedding car hire become more popular. Self drive opens up a range of more unusual cars such as Fiat 500s, Morris Minors and Jaguar E Types, and is a more flexible and usually cheaper solution.  You do have to do a bit more work - generally involving collecting the car - but most established hire companies like Great Escape Cars will help you plan the logistics and timings.

Get the colour right


Photographers like the wedding cars because they add an extra variety to photographs. So choose the colour of your car carefully. It needs to match your theme, of course, but should be distinctive but not overpowering - you want people to remember the people in it and photographed with it, not just the car.


Be as practical as you want to be


Selecting the right car for your wedding involves some compromise. Wedding cars, whether old or new, are rarely the most practical vehicles, but they are usually the most stylish. So when choosing your car consider how easy it is to get in and out - elegantly - and what protection there is for the bride's hair. Consider the number of seats you need.  Convertibles are very popular but work best on sunny, still days.
No car needs to be discounted and the right choice for you will depend on your priorities.  But it is worth taking some risks to get a car that you will remember and enjoy seeing in photographs years and years after your day. As long as you take these practical considerations into account you'll get the right car for you.

Who's going to drive you home?


Whether you choose chauffeur hire or self drive hire, you need to get the right driver for the job and they need to be briefed properly. If you choose chauffeur hire bear in mind that they'll be the odd sock in the draw when you're enjoying the only private moment of the day driving between church and venue.
Self drive hire can mean the groom gets behind the wheel - or delegates this to one of the wedding party. Either way, the driver needs to be clear on their route, the timings and the intricacies of driving your chosen classic car.  At Great Escape Cars we offer a familiarisation option for wedding drivers before the big day - it's well worth doing. 

To ribbon or not to ribbon?
Wedding cars are wedding ribbons, so tradition has it, go together like X Factor contestants and tears. For some, ivory ribbons are a must. But for a growing minority, ribbons are a bit passe and they want their car to be simple and unadorned. Make sure that if you choose ribbons they look right on the car and suit what you want for your day.

Great Escape Cars has the largest fleet of self drive wedding cars in the UK.  To find out more call 01527 893733 or visit http://www.greatescapecars.co.uk 














 

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